Tag Archives: Human behaviour

Nick Tyler carrying a cardboard box

Nick Tyler talking walking

Nick Tyler is Chadwick Chair of Civil Engineering at University College London and is the director of PAMELA one of the largest research laboratories in the country. However, as we learn from this softly-spoken professor it is not large enough, so he is now overseeing the building of a laboratory called PEARL in Dagenham (see image below). What has all this got to do with walking you ask? As Andrew Stuck learned in this conversation recorded before the pandemic, Nick is as interested in the fine grain detail of pedestrian behaviour as he is in engineering spaces that work for people. We also get an inkling of how the 2 metre social distance might have been decided upon, once the COVID virus had struck. 29’44″ 13.9MB

Download notes of items mentioned in the interview with Nick Tyler

Featured image: Nick Tyler taking part in a walkshop commissioned by the Parasol Unit, London – taken by Simon Waters

Riccardo Marini talking walking

Riccardo Marini’s accent belies his Italian upbringing.  When Andrew Stuck met him a dozen years ago, he was Design Lead for the City of Edinburgh and Andrew was a researcher for the Academy of Urbanism. Since then, working first as a director for Jan Gehl Architects and now as founder of Marini Urbanismo, he has worked with cities to make their commercial cores more people-friendly.  They are in London’s West End, in the midst of the mid-morning hubbub on a chilly December day, so Ricardo’s cogent, forceful and passionate argument for putting pedestrians first is even more pertinent.  24’16” 11.4MB

Download notes of items mentioned in the interview with Riccardo_Marini

Tim Stonor talking walking

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Tim Stonor is the Managing Director of Space Syntax Limited, a firm of architects and planners that are specialists in the scientific analysis of pedestrian behaviour. Their work looks at movement at every scale of the city, forecasting where people will walk, cycle, drive or be driven, should a change in the street pattern or built environment be altered. They have had a hand in the redevelopment of public realm in many traditional cities, not least in London’s prime public squares, but they have also developed forecasting techniques to predict movement patterns in future cities.

The discussion ranges widely, considering how we get around now and how digital technologies will alter the way we will navigate the cities of the future. The interview was recorded in St Andrew’s Gardens in Bloomsbury, just a short walk from Space Syntax’s offices, in June 2013. 24’33” 11.5MB

Download notes of items mentioned in this interview: Tim_Stonor